1st evoDOMUS – Bensonwood Project Underway

evodomus rendering

Architect’s Rendering by Alexander Kolbe

When husband and wife architects Alexander and Michelle Kolbe, co-founders of evoDOMUS, a Cleveland-based firm, wanted to design and build high-quality, sustainable homes in the U.S., they went looking for a manufacturing partner who could match the quality of homes they built in Alexander’s native country of Germany.

They sought a montage homebuilding company of the caliber of the venerable Huf Haus and Baufritz, Germany’s leading off-site building companies, which helped establish off-site panelized building as the primary construction methodology throughout Europe. Both companies are more than a century old and, like Bensonwood Unity Homes, combine timber framing influences with advanced design and high-performance building.

However, the Kolbes wanted a more personal connection to the client through the entire process—the level of attention a smaller company could provide—to reduce the stress homeowners often associate with a custom house project, such as designers not tuned-in to their clients’ needs, unreliable contractors, as well as schedule and budget overruns. After thoroughly researching high-quality panelized builders, fabricators and timberframers, the names Tedd Benson and Bensonwood kept popping up. So Alexander got on the phone and, much to his astonishment, Tedd picked up.

Upon hearing of the Kolbes’ high standards and montage building interest, Tedd replied, “That’s exactly what we’re doing!” A meeting with Tedd and project manager Hans Porschitz followed and it was soon apparent that the synergies and shared values of the two companies were aligned. A relationship was established: Bensonwood would fabricate the evoDOMUS home shells.

Now, the first joint project between evoDOMUS and Bensonwood is underway in Fairfield County Connecticut: a 5,000+ SF 4-bedroom Bauhaus-inspired modernist home in the “Cloud” Series of evoDOMUS homes. Strikingly original and family-friendly, Cloud is also inspired by current Mexican and Spanish interpretations of modern residential architecture. Customized to their clients’ needs, the home’s clean lines, contemporary materials and use of advanced building science are all characteristic of evoDOMUS home designs.

evodomus elevation

East & West Elevations

Designing the home for its two-acre site had its challenges; its wooded setting with wetlands, an awkward slope and rock ledges all needed careful  consideration. In addition, the home had to incorporate passive as well as active solar design, requiring precise siting along with design elements such as a south-facing second floor loggia to shade the first floor in summer months.

The Kolbes’ strong focus on sustainability prompted the use of triple-glazed Loewen windows and a Zender Energy Recovery Ventilator, which recovers up to 90% of the energy of the extract air to warm the incoming fresh air, saving on heating costs. The air distribution system then channels the optimally tempered fresh air to individual rooms as needed. The exterior is clad in Resysta siding made of rice husks, common salt and mineral oil, which makes it both environmentally friendly as well as extremely weather resistant against sun, rain, snow or salt water. Resysta siding also requires minimal care and offers the look and feel of wood and can be painted.
evodomus logo

The home has 4,100 SF of living space with 2 stories above grade and a 900 SF finished basement and 924 SF garage. Off the garage are a mud room, a half bath and a yoga fitness room. The first floor has an open great room with living and dining areas adjoining another open space with a kitchen and family room. Rounding out the first floor is a bedroom/study with adjacent bath. The second floor plan includes the master bedroom, three additional bedrooms (each open to a long balcony), a family bath, a study and a laundry room.

evodomus floor plan

First Floor Plan

EvoDOMUS uses low or no VOC paints and finishes in their homes and only formaldehyde-free materials. Material selections consist primarily of products with high-recycle content, as well as FSC certified woods and bamboo.

Alexander and Michelle Kolbe wanted to offer their customers not only the highest quality, sustainable homes available, but an excellent experience as well. By partnering with Bensonwood, evoDOMUS could put its resources into delivering superior design, customer service and care, rather than making investment in fabrication facilities, with financial partners and the loss of control and client interaction that would imply.

By maintaining that control, evoDOMUS is able to fulfill its mission of making homes as beautifully designed and high quality as German cars—with a customer experience to match.

Southern Comfort: A Unity Zūm Rises in Asheville, NC

front 2Zum_Mimken_DD_Page_1Situated 2,000 ft. above sea level in the Appalachian mountains, Asheville, North Carolina has a full range of temperatures with average January lows of 28 degrees F and average July highs of 85 degrees F, making it a prime location for Unity Homes’ energy-stingy houses. In a nutshell, Zūm’s low-load building envelope offers year-round comfort with minimal energy input, making F3 (fossil fuel free) living easily achievable. And when combined with energy rebates and incentives, the Zūm the home was even more affordable.

In addition to financial health, Zūm promotes personal health as well with its green, low-VOC materials throughout, exceptional indoor air quality, minuscule room-to-room and floor-to-ceiling temperature variants, abundance of natural light, and sound dampening shell that keeps outside noises outside.

2013.11.27_Zum_Mimken_DD_Page_2The client for Unity’s first Zūm, Nick Mimken, is a repeat client, having built his first house with Bensonwood back in 2001: an island house on Nantucket. According to Nick: “I had had a very good experience building the timber frame Nantucket house: it proved to be everything you said it would be…and more,” adding that “the Bensonwood architect, Bill Holtz, and the crew had been top notch and worked amazingly well with the local builder.”

On his latest homebuilding project with Unity Homes, Nick continues:

 Fast forward a dozen or so years and this time around I was thinking about downsizing and wanted something smaller and energy efficient when I learned about Bensonwood’s new Unity Homes. Being interested in zero energy design, I visited your headquarters, met with architect Randall Walter and sales person John Dunbar, and as before, I was impressed with the way you use the latest technology. They walked me through the computer modeling and site lines, etc. and I was sold on the process.

IMG_7150Unity Homes provided a “Tempo Offering;” a package including the home’s shell, millwork and mechanicals—ideal for do-it-yourselfers wanting to complete their prefab home in phases, or in this instance, for a client looking to build on a distant site outside our home region of New England—hiring a local builder to finish the home.

MIMKEN ZUMThe builder, Jody Guokas of JAG Construction, is finishing out the home with contemporary cement panels similar to those used on our Unity House college president’s residence in Maine, and on the Catherine Houghton Arts Center in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

Again, according to the owner/builder:

 “My local green builder, Jody Guokas, wasn’t interested in the project initially, but when he learned that Bensonwood had designed the home and would be installing the shell, he jumped on it. He wanted to learn from Bensonwood’s processes. One member of Jody’s crew had even worked at Bensonwood for a spell, so the fit was perfect.”

 P1040501The build site is a challenging, heavily-wooded lot, with the home’s footprint coming close to the setbacks on all four sides. This required the crane to precisely pick and set the wall and roof panels to avoid tree limbs, power lines and neighboring houses.IMG_7156

As for project management, Nick added: “Unity’s Ryan Lawler deserves a blue star. He worked tirelessly with me, calmly working out problems.”

Asked to sum up his experience, Nick Mimken said, “For me, it’s a story of good people, good reputation, and good process.” He then offered, “It’s a small world, so this counts.”

 

Project Update: A Solar Studio

studio-001When Keene, New Hampshire photographer Steve Holmes wanted a studio space, he was driven by a lifestyle decision to connect his business to family and home. He also wanted more touch points for an enhanced client experience, where they could initially meet Steve, discuss the shoot, be photographed, then review the finished work.

studio-003Holmes, who specializes in portrait and wedding photography, came to Bensonwood through a recommendation from a friend for whom we recently built a home in Idaho. Holmes knew what he wanted for his studio and provided Bensonwood architect Randall Walter with Adobe Illustrator sketches of his ideas.

The Holmes Studio as completed complements the local vernacular; the exterior is a traditional shed-barn design, while the interior has a clean, contemporary look with a more refined feel. It features high ceilings to accommodate professional lighting and ample windows to allow plenty of soft, natural light from the north side into the studio space.

studio-002The versatile 1,224 square foot space features a covered porch and a greeting room to meet with clients and show them portraits, a bathroom, dressing room, workshop and storage space. A large, rigid projection screen on the back of the massive sliding, barn-style door dividing the office and studio spaces was Steve’s idea, which woodworking team leader Kevin Bittender made a reality in Douglas fir, customized with Better Barns hardware and a low-VOC finistudio-005sh.studio-004

Because of his engagement in the process, Steve found the design-build process very enjoyable. He especially likes the feature of the 3,000 pound single beam that spans the length of the building, adding a subtle nod to the rustic New England vernacular and balancing the contemporary interior design with the heavy timbers for which Bensonwood is so well known.

Solar SourceIMG_4837 in Keene, New Hampshire supplied the grid-tied photovoltaic system that, over a year, produces more electricity than the studio needs. Holmes says he really enjoys watching his electric meter spin backwards as the 13.85 kW solar electric system feeds energy back to the utility.IMG_4838

A White Mountains Contemporary

Q&A with Owner/Builder Jeff Gilbert

smallMBR Glass Porch_1

How did you learn about us?

“I am Vice-Chair of the board of the non-profit New Hampshire Preservation Alliance and last fall we attended a retreat which toured  Southwestern NH, stopping at the Bensonwood Woodworking Shop in Alstead. While there, Tedd Benson showed up and gave an engaging talk on Bensonwood’s blend of craft and technology to build better houses. That eventually led to continued discussions with Tedd and (Bensonwood architect) Randall Walter on a home project I was working on in the White Mountains.”

What about Bensonwood resonated with you?

“I had a generic interest in utilizing computer technology in the integration of design and systems. The flexibility implicit in Bensonwood’s design and fabrication appealed to me. I was especially interested in Bensonwood’s approach to building systems: craftsmen-created with superior fit and finish, all leading to energy-efficient and environmentally friendly homes. The whole concept of applying technology to the home to make a better product interested me.”

smallGilbert_8

How did you get interested in building science?

“For a while, after law school in 1971, I moonlighted for Emil Hanslin & Tony Hanslin of Yankee Barn, selling lots at the Eastman Four Season recreational community in Grantham, NH, when I wasn’t doing my day job as a lawyer. I became interesting in building systems and off-site fabrication, as a better approach to building homes.”

“Later I became interested in the fabrication of homes and followed Acorn Deck House and others.”

How did you arrive at the distinctive design for your home?

“I had been working with an architect to design a contemporary home, but was looking for a more  overtly contemporary and distinctive design. Working with Randall Walter and Tim Olson, we were able to achieve this through the use of  dramatic shed roofs  and glass curtain walls.”

How interested were you in energy performance”

smallGilbert_7“In one of my conversations with Tedd, he mentioned that Bensonwood homes, properly sited, could maintain 42 degrees F in the dead of a northern New England winter—with the heat turned off! This appealed to me because we’ll only live part of the year in our White Mountain home. Also, with the low load of the building envelope, I can use a relatively small forced air HVAC system.”

Tell me about the property and the siting of your house.

“The house is sited south and east to take advantage of the spectacular 180 degree view overlooking the jewel of the state park system: Franconia Notch and Ridge, Mt. Lafayette, Mt. Liberty, Haystack Mountain, and Cannon Mountain ski area and, further to the east, Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. This southeast exposure will also take advantage of passive solar.”

smallMBR Glass Porch_2“My wife, who had grown up in the Littleton area and I  bought the property from a next door neighbor, who happened to be her choir teacher in school. The land abuts a two-acre conservation parcel that is a lupin field.”

How have you found working with Bensonwood so far?

“It’s been a collaborative experience: working harmoniously to develop the design. And as far as flexibility goes, being a developer, I like that I could get the high quality shell from Bensonwood, and then general contract the job myself. That really made sense for me.”

 

jeffrey-gilbertJeff Gilbert is a businessman who graduated from Dartmouth College and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He practiced law for 14 years, and thereafter spent a number of years as an investment banker. Currently, he is one of the two principals of W.J.P. Development, LLC that owns and manages three community shopping centers in New Hampshire. Since 2000, Mr. Gilbert has been active in politics, serving as a NH State Representative until 2005. From 2002 to 2004, he was Vice Chairman of the Ways & Means Committee of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, Chairman of the State Revenue Estimating Panel, Chairman of the Joint House and Senate Economic Development Study Committee, and a member of the joint House and Senate Higher Education Oversight Committee. Mr. Gilbert presently serves the State as Treasurer of the Port Advisory Council and as a member of the State Parks System Advisory Council. He is Chairman of the Board of Trustees of New Hampshire Public Broadcasting and President of the Board of Trustees of The Housing Partnership, a local organization providing affordable and workforce housing in the seacoast region. He is also Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors of The New Hampshire Preservation Alliance and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Portsmouth Athenaeum. Mr. Gilbert has three grown children and resides with his wife in Rye, New Hampshire.

 

Passive House: The House of the Future | Sheri Koones

Passive House: The House of the Future | Sheri Koones

smaller_version_400x400Posted: 05/08/2014

From our old friend Sheri Koones in the Huffington Post yesterday. We appeared in prefabulousher popular 2012 book Prefabulous + Almost Off the Grid: Your Path to Building an Energy-Independent Home.

The Passive House (or Passivhaus) (PH) was first established in Germany and is quickly becoming a standard in many parts of the world, including the United States. Whereas other important standards, such as LEED), focus on many environmentally friendly aspects of the home, such as site location, sustainability, materials, water efficiency and so on, Passive House only focuses on energy and ventilation.

Inspiring and Building the Next Generation of Residential Energy Professionals

DOE STUDENT CHALLENGE DESIGN AWARDSThe Challenge Home Student Design Competition seeks to inspire the next generation of architects, engineers, construction managers, and entrepreneurs to design homes that meet requirements for zero energy ready performance that are affordable and market-ready. In turn, the competition provides students with skills and experience for careers in clean energy.

This week, the U.S. Department of Energy announced today the winners of the first competition. The winning teams produced market-ready, state of the art design solutions for high-performance homes that are energy efficient, comfortable and durable. The designs are for zero energy ready homes, meaning their high performance features sharply reduce energy use and all or most of the remaining energy use can be offset with renewable energy.

MONTAGE DESIGN TEAM WINNERSWe are honored that one of the winning teams, Montage Builders – Northern Forest, thanked Tedd Benson and Bensonwood Head of Engineering Chris Carbone for inspiration and support. Tedd and Chris met team members and SUNY – ESF students Michelle Tinner and Peter LiCongo recently at the NY Green Building Conference where he was a keynote speaker and Carbone led a session on “Designing and Building with Heavy Timber.”

Montage Builders – Northern Forest student team leader Michelle Tinner describes her team and their influences this way:

“We were very inspired by Tedd’s use of the word montage. Here is how we define the term as it relates to our team name: Montage Builders – Northern Forest. Montage, a combination of different elements that forms a unified whole, references our teams diverse multi-cultural and multi-generational aggregation of perspectives and experiences, which is the key for the success of our design.

Northern Forest acknowledges the importance of regionally specific design and the default (pre-development) landscape of our region – used for accurate site ecosystem service assessment.

Our team was unique in that we brought together students and faculty from three different educational institutions – all other teams represented just one. We also integrated may different disciplines which supported our holistic approach. We have communications designers, interior designers, architects, landscape architects, environmental scientists, engineers, and construction managers on our team.

An important parallel between Tedd Benson’s approach and our’s is the use of natural materials, the reliance on traditional ecological knowledge, and the reference to historically relevant architecture. We used American Craftsman style architecture which was popularized by a local designer Gustav Stickley. The style is inherently honest and promotes the use natural materials like wood, which is locally available and environmentally preferred, it discourages functionless additions such as fake dormers (the McMansion’s failed attempt at not looking silly), and can be found throughout Syracuse’s neighborhood ensuring that our design would fit the local pattern language. Many of the other designs at the competition were modern.

We were all delighted to have Tedd attend our presentation at the New York State Green Building Conference. He smiled at us the entire time we were up there presenting – probably because he was pleasantly surprised that we were using his favorite word. Having his support and that of Chris Carbone, who got us a timber framed pergola quote at the 11th hour was encouraging and meant a lot to us.”

DOE CHALLENGE HOME LOGOThe team was led by three faculty advisors: Paul Crovella, Ken Bobis and Kevin Stack.

Right now, there’s a need to develop cost-effective designs that are at least 40-50% more efficient that a standard new home. These homes are so energy efficient they offset all or most annual energy consumption with a renewable energy system, such as solar.

To support this increased demand, the Energy Department’s Building Technologies Office is helping to develop a strong workforce with core competencies in building science, including direct entry workers, recent college graduates, and those in continuing education through a number of high-impact initiatives and programs, such as the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals, Solar Decathlon, and the Energy Department’s Challenge Home Student Design Competition.

LEED Platinum-Certified Bensonwood Project Wins 4th Award

A view of the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building as you approach from the road.

A view of the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building as you approach from the road.

The LEED Platinum-Certified Burr and Burton Academy Mountain Campus in Peru, VT, which Bensonwood designed, engineered and built, is a recipient of the 2014 Governor’s Awards for Environmental Excellence.

Environmental excellence awards have been given since 1993 to recognize efforts and actions of Vermonters to conserve and protect natural resources, prevent pollution, and promote environmental sustainability. To date, more than 200 efforts have been recognized.

“These projects contribute significantly to Vermont’s environmental quality and encourage others to take similar actions to protect our resources,” said Deb Markowitz, Secretary of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. “They demonstrate the importance of innovation and partnerships in enhancing and sustaining Vermont’s environmental quality.”

Award winners will be recognized at the Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility Annual Spring Conference on May 14 at the Davis Center on the University of Vermont campus in Burlington.

front of BBA's mountain campus by Bensonwood

The front entrance of the LEED Platinum-certified, net-zero energy building.

This is the fourth award in the past four months for the building. BBA’s Mountain Campus also won Efficiency Vermont’s 2014 Better Buildings by Design “Best of the Best” in Commercial Building Design and Construction, recognizing innovative and integrated design approaches for energy efficiency in Vermont’s commercial and residential buildings.

BBA Heater

The ultra-efficient masonry heater in the school building is integral to warming the building.

In November, the Mountain Campus earned a prestigious Engineering News-Record “Award of Merit” and in January 2014, it won the “AIA New Hampshire Merit Award.” The AIA jury said: “The respect for the environment is as integral to the architecture as it is to the mission of the school. The jury appreciated how the structure, columns, and framing define the composition and are a metaphor for the forest setting.”

Like Unity Homes and other Bensonwood custom timber frame projects, the building was largely prefabricated offsite and erected quickly in the forested setting to minimize impact to the local ecology.

Industry Insider: Tedd Benson – Timber Home Living

Industry Insider: Tedd Benson – Timber Home Living.

One of the most celebrated homebuilders in America, Tedd Benson is a true champion of the traditional timber-frame home — with a modern twist. 

Tedd Benson, Founding Owner, Bensonwood

Tedd Benson, Founding Owner, Bensonwood & Unity Homes

Ask any member of the timber-frame community who has had a major impact on reviving the art of traditional timber framing in recent years, and you’ll most likely hear the same response time and time again: Tedd Benson. READ MORE

Passive House Wins Award for “Best Energy-Efficient Project”

Steven and Barbara Landau’s Norwich, Vermont, Passive House won The Builders and Remodelers Association of Greater Boston (BRAGB) Prism Gold Award for “Best Energy-Efficient Project.” Bensonwood, who designed the prefabricated insulated panels and constructed the timberframe shell, was honored as part of a highly-skilled green building team that included energy modeling and mechanical consultantsZeroEnergy Design, consulting architect Paul R. Bilgen, general contractor Estes and Gallup, and custom window and door maker, Architectural Openings. The innovative, sustainable home previously won the 2012 Efficiency Vermont “Best of the Best in Residential New Construction” Honor Award.

The 17-inch recycled foam sheet insulation provides R-75 value and a vapor barrier below the slab. All hot water is provided by two rooftop, flat-plate solar collectors with an electric on-demand water heater for backup. One kilowatt heating mats located under floor tiles in the bathrooms supply radiant heating, and air exchange is managed by a Heat Recovery Ventilator whose operation automatically adjusts, depending on temperature, humidity, and occupancy. In the kitchen/living room a sealed combustion chamber wood stove serves both as cooktop and bake oven, as well as a source of supplemental heat. The eco-friendly 2,457 square foot home also earned 41 Home Energy Rating index points, meaning it is 59% more efficient than a standard new home.

BRAGB, a trade association affiliated with the National Association of Home Builders and Home Builders Association of Massachusetts, has represented the building industry since 1944 and is one of the leading trade associations in New England.

Burr and Burton Academy

A view of the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building as you approach from the road.

A view of the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building as you approach from the road.

At Bensonwood we’re proud of our nearly 40 year history as the premier designer/builder of energy-efficient timber frame, hybrid, and other high-performance homes.

But we have also built a strong reputation for designing and building LEED certified, energy efficient and architecturally striking commercial buildings and specialty structures.

Recently, Bensonwood Lead Architect Randall Walter and other members of our architecture and engineering team designed the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building.

Dedicated on August 23, 2012 in time for the opening of the school’s fall semester, the building is designed to be a living classroom with a goal of achieving LEED Platinum designation and Net-Zero energy status.

BBA Heater

The masonry heater is a focal point within the “Clearing” in the Mountain Campus Academic Building

Randall worked closely with the Burr and Burton team to ensure that the building not only fit into the natural surroundings of the site but truly became part of the learning experience for students, blending scientific architecture with artistic abstraction. Design features include ceilings inspired by the structure of the underside of a leaf, a skylight that casts light on the native Vermont slate clad masonry heater, between two reclaimed oak trees primary walls splayed at 14.5 degrees, celebrating the variation between true north and magnetic north in southern Vermont.

In keeping with typical Bensonwood design and construction practices, locally sourced materials where used wherever possible.

Speaking at the dedication ceremony Randall noted that a quote by Winston Churchill inspired the design – “We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.”

Below Randall has provided additional information on some of the features of the building:

Size

  • Primary building area: 4000 square feet
  • Total building including overhangs: 6200 square feet

Building Materials

  • Marvin Ultimate clad Triple glazed windows and doors (R-5)
  • Cellulose insulated walls (R-35) and roof (R-60)
  • Red Oak – log posts from Alstead, NH & BBA campus
  • Nordic-Lam – engineered timbers – Canadian black spruce
  • Eastern white pine – rafters & ceiling boards
  • White and red pine wall boards (red pine from BBA campus)
  • Hemlock – rough sawn, random width siding from NH and VT
  • Western cedars – exterior posts and beams
  • Sliding barn doors – reclaimed local barn board, oak frames
  • VT sourced maple benches and window sills
  • VT Shadow Grey slate tile
  • VT Verde Green brushed marble counters and hearth

Interior and Exterior Finishes

  • Vermont Natural Coatings – whey based finish – used on all wood and concrete surfaces
  • All finishes have low or no Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

Performance

  • Wood burning masonry heater
  • Air-source heat pumps
  • Energy Recovery Ventilators for fresh air
  • Photovoltaic arrays (Sept/Oct install) to achieve Zero net energy
  • All plumbing fixtures exceed EPA water sense standards
  • Preliminary blower door test below Passiv standards for air infiltration (495cfm@ACH50)

Construction Schedule

  • Foundation installed November 2011
  • Prefabrication offsite over winter
  • Site access reopened April 2012
  • Delivery of prefabricated parts and assembly begins May 2012
  • Building completed in 4 months
  • Waste management plan exceeded LEED requirements – near 93% waste diversion
  • Anticipated LEED points 82-83 (Platinum threshold is 80)