Sunday River Ski Retreat: The Best of All Worlds

Tedford ElevationSome ski homes high on the mountain have beautiful views down the valley. Others near the base lodge typically have great views up the slopes. This timberframe home at The Glades at Ridge Run, a new slopeside residential neighborhood at Sunday River Resort in Newry, Maine, captures both.

Situated in the western mountains of Maine just three hours from Boston, Sunday River Resort has long been one of New England’s most popular four-season playgrounds, but what is so special about the property that owners Meredith and Jamie found here is that it sits uniquely midway up the mountain with expansive views above and below.

Though Meredith and Jamie had just completed an extensive renovation on another home and weren’t anxious to begin a new construction, this was the first time a ski-on, ski-off home opportunity was available at Sunday River, so the couple knew they had to jump on it. They were also motivated to replace an old beloved, but small, ski lodge they had outgrown. Sensitive to the feeling of transplanting their relatives away from a getaway that had been in the family for years, they wanted an open concept floor plan with the feel of a true home. They also wanted to maximize family interaction, and minimize the size of the house to facilitate that function—as well as for aesthetic and environmental impact motives.

sunday river family ski lodge renderingPast renovations had taught Meredith and Jamie to be flexible but decisive, which helped in this first new house project. They also knew from experience that “design by committee” was something to be avoided, rather it was better to create a team dynamic between client and architect that respected roles and responsibilities, but also valued input from all parties. The mutual trust that developed allowed changes to be made fluidly and without conflict.

The Bensonwood design team of Randall Walter, Curtis Fanti and Dave Levasseur, all avid skiers in their own right, were excited to create this special place from a perspective of years spent skiing and snowboarding. Their personal insights proved invaluable in informing practical aspects of the design.

The architectural review process at the resort and the corresponding design standards requires development that complements the surrounding natural setting; minimizing the impact on the landscape while allowing for individual freedom of design to suit the needs of each homeowner. A common theme, described as a Northeast Cottage with Adirondack and Shingle Style influences, dictates the use of building materials, colors, landscaping and building style at the resort. The style is best illustrated in Summer Cottages in the White Mountains by Bryant F. Tolles, Jr. (2000), in which the use of native materials blended with natural colors provides an effective link to both the local environment and the great cottage architecture of the early 20th century.

Sunday river ski lodgeWorking closely with the clients, the resort, the civil engineering firm Main-Land Development Consultants, Inc., and the town zoning board, Randall was able to design the energy-efficient home into a challenging site with steep terrain and protected wetlands. He was able to navigate the regulations and arrive at the design—a traditional Adirondack timber lodge style with a modern twist on the gables to accommodate the views—in a way that pleased all the parties involved. In the end, the review board process was easy and the owners got a home that fit their needs and respectfully fit the mountain landscape.

Another welcome test for Bensonwood is the truncated construction timeline. With designs finalized this past spring, the owners wanted to ski from the home this coming winter. Anxious to prove that even a custom 3,900 SF mountain home on an undeveloped site could go up in record time with our Open-Built® systems and offsite fabrication, the Bensonwood team embraced the challenge. Rapid onsite assembly will also help cut build times in half over conventional construction, effectively giving the homeowners an entire extra season to enjoy the resort.

ski deckLike many of Bensonwood’s mountain and shore homes, the house features gable roof lines, with one important distinction: these gables, dormers and bump outs will have asymmetric rooflines that permit both mountain and valley vistas as well as views of arriving and departing skiers. These roof angles, along with the heavy, rough sawn, red cedar clapboards, work to give the exterior its distinctive look: at the same time both traditional and contemporary, while the property’s southern exposure allows for plenty of natural daylighting and passive solar gain.

On the inside every detail of the sanctuary, which will accommodate three generations of family, has been strategically planned. The owners wanted to maximize the use of space, and that included the kids’ space on the ground level, with the fun feel of a ski resort locker area. The ground floor has a rustic lumberjack-inspired kids zone, with a mud room off the garage, an open play area, a game room, a guest bedroom, a bunkroom with three beds, and facing his and hers bathrooms.

The first floor has a large open space plan with cathedral ceiling and a gathering area across from the kitchen/pantry and adjacent to the dining area. The dining room will have a long, farmhouse-style table with benches accommodating 10 or more. The second floor plan has three bedroom suites, each with their own bath, and a balcony open to the gathering area below.

sunday river ski lodge renderingPerhaps the most unique feature of the project, however, is a very innovative ski-on, ski-off deck. The custom deck required Randall to create a multi-functional outdoor living space with views up and down the mountain in a style that also satisfied design review board restrictions. His solution was adjust the roof pitch and angles so skiers on the deck will still be able to enjoy the views, as he had done on the main house.

Mindful of the homeowners’ sensitivities to limiting the home’s size, he placed the deck atop the garage so skiers will have easy to the home’s bathrooms and kitchen on the main floor when they ski home at lunchtime. Unique features include a hot tub—not tucked away in a secluded spot as is often seen—but in the open air on the sheltered ski deck so all guests have ready access. There are also ski and snowboard racks, overhead heating elements, a fireplace and a hot tub on the deck.

FLOORPLANOne of the most creative elements of the home is one the clients devised. Rather than the traditional guest book for visitors to sign, the couple will immortalize them with a round timber into which they can carve their names and the dates they stay, creating a family legacy crafted in wood that will last for generations—just like the home.

Architect Randall Walter predicts that, like many vacation homes Bensonwood has crafted over the past 40 years, this house will be used much more than originally intended, because families often discover they enjoy spending time in them so much more than in their primary residence.

 

 

 

Burr and Burton Academy

A view of the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building as you approach from the road.

A view of the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building as you approach from the road.

At Bensonwood we’re proud of our nearly 40 year history as the premier designer/builder of energy-efficient timber frame, hybrid, and other high-performance homes.

But we have also built a strong reputation for designing and building LEED certified, energy efficient and architecturally striking commercial buildings and specialty structures.

Recently, Bensonwood Lead Architect Randall Walter and other members of our architecture and engineering team designed the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building.

Dedicated on August 23, 2012 in time for the opening of the school’s fall semester, the building is designed to be a living classroom with a goal of achieving LEED Platinum designation and Net-Zero energy status.

BBA Heater

The masonry heater is a focal point within the “Clearing” in the Mountain Campus Academic Building

Randall worked closely with the Burr and Burton team to ensure that the building not only fit into the natural surroundings of the site but truly became part of the learning experience for students, blending scientific architecture with artistic abstraction. Design features include ceilings inspired by the structure of the underside of a leaf, a skylight that casts light on the native Vermont slate clad masonry heater, between two reclaimed oak trees primary walls splayed at 14.5 degrees, celebrating the variation between true north and magnetic north in southern Vermont.

In keeping with typical Bensonwood design and construction practices, locally sourced materials where used wherever possible.

Speaking at the dedication ceremony Randall noted that a quote by Winston Churchill inspired the design – “We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.”

Below Randall has provided additional information on some of the features of the building:

Size

  • Primary building area: 4000 square feet
  • Total building including overhangs: 6200 square feet

Building Materials

  • Marvin Ultimate clad Triple glazed windows and doors (R-5)
  • Cellulose insulated walls (R-35) and roof (R-60)
  • Red Oak – log posts from Alstead, NH & BBA campus
  • Nordic-Lam – engineered timbers – Canadian black spruce
  • Eastern white pine – rafters & ceiling boards
  • White and red pine wall boards (red pine from BBA campus)
  • Hemlock – rough sawn, random width siding from NH and VT
  • Western cedars – exterior posts and beams
  • Sliding barn doors – reclaimed local barn board, oak frames
  • VT sourced maple benches and window sills
  • VT Shadow Grey slate tile
  • VT Verde Green brushed marble counters and hearth

Interior and Exterior Finishes

  • Vermont Natural Coatings – whey based finish – used on all wood and concrete surfaces
  • All finishes have low or no Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

Performance

  • Wood burning masonry heater
  • Air-source heat pumps
  • Energy Recovery Ventilators for fresh air
  • Photovoltaic arrays (Sept/Oct install) to achieve Zero net energy
  • All plumbing fixtures exceed EPA water sense standards
  • Preliminary blower door test below Passiv standards for air infiltration (495cfm@ACH50)

Construction Schedule

  • Foundation installed November 2011
  • Prefabrication offsite over winter
  • Site access reopened April 2012
  • Delivery of prefabricated parts and assembly begins May 2012
  • Building completed in 4 months
  • Waste management plan exceeded LEED requirements – near 93% waste diversion
  • Anticipated LEED points 82-83 (Platinum threshold is 80)