Tedd Benson “In the House” on PBS with Ken Burns and Kevin O’Connor

Burns-Benson-PBSOn In the House, a three-part series now available on the PBS website, award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns and Bensonwood’s Tedd Benson, join This Old House host Kevin O’Connor, to discuss Burns’ timber frame barn that combines the unique spiritual feel of 19th century New England with modern-day functionality and comfort.

In a conversation with O’Connor, two stewards of American history, Burns and Benson, offer their shared perspective on the values, teamwork and community behind their two very different yet related American trades. Using Burns’ recently completed Bensonwood barn as the central focus of the film, they discuss the practical, spiritual and community values behind these agrarian cathedrals.

In their discussion, Burns and Benson laud American barn architecture for its elemental simplicity, honesty and truthfulness; where there are no tricks, nothing is hidden, and its magnificent structure remains permanently on display for centuries. Through this lens, the barn becomes a metaphor for the democratic values and commitment that built this country.

In Part 1, the men delve deep into the artistic and collaborative process, and the philosophy of filmmaking through the lens of building.

In Part 2, Benson and Ken Burns describe the thrilling ceremony of raising the barn’s structure, bringing together Burns’ friends, family and local community members. Benson paints a vivid picture of the ancient ceremonial nature, and Burns notes the special day reminded him of a bigger idea: “We are not alone, we require a community.”

In Part 3, Tedd Benson presents the distinct American timber barn history and Burns highlights the practical and spiritual dimensions of those spaces, calling them “the most powerful of art forms.” Burns demonstrates his depth of understanding of Benson’s craft and his dedication to honoring the building through humility and teamwork. Tedd and Ken talk about the emotion and joy that comes with a good old fashion American barn raising.

Customized Unity Xyla 212 Sits Softly on the Land

xyla 212

Artist’s rendering of our standard Unity Homes Xyla 212.

Dan Farrell and Melora Kennedy have long been interested in nature conservation. So when they wanted to build a healthy, comfortable, energy-efficient home — close enough to town that he could walk or bicycle to work—a friend, builder and energy consultant, Mark Snyder, suggested they call Unity Homes. Dan works for the Vermont Chapter of the Nature Conservancy as their Conservation Information Manager/GIS Analyst. Melora teaches preschool and kindergarten. The “GIS” in Dan’s title stands for Geographic Information Systems: a science which lets us visualize, question, analyze, interpret and understand data to reveal relationships, patterns, and trends. In the conservation context, GIS would come in handy in evaluating the impact his new home would have on his sloped, 8.9 acre parcel of land, with its old field species and natural plantings — some edible — as well as diverse wildlife crossings.Screenshot 2014-06-23 10.06.14 Unity’s low-waste off-site fabrication and rapid on-site assembly — coupled with its natural materials, extraordinary energy efficiency, and energy-sipping mechanical systems — will all help to reduce the carbon footprint on the sensitive landscape. Their Xyla 212, customized for a walkout, is heated and cooled with an air source heat pump and an optional ERV (Energy Recovery Ventilator) to condition air with minimal energy loss. Both HRV (Heat Recovery Ventilator) and ERV systems are vastly more energy efficient than plain ventilation systems or exhaust-only systems with no heat or energy recovery. Despite its higher up-front cost, Dan chose an ERV system for its edge in operating efficiencies, air filtration, degree of comfort (through greater humidification/dehumidification control) and environmental impact.

air pohoda ashp

The Air Pohoda ERV used in the Farrell home in a special housing devised by our Building Systems team.

Unity’s standard HRV system is designed to recover approx 80% of the heat in the air that is being exhausted from the house, while the ERV (Energy Recovery Ventilation system) is expected to recover over 90%. Given the ERV’s added efficiency, there would be a relatively short payback period on its premium cost over the standard HRV system. In comparing the ventilation systems, the ERV units are expected to save about 1315 kWh per year over the HRV system. At $0.15/ kWh, that comes to almost $200 per year at the current electric rate, with those savings continuing to rise as electricity rates increase. The Return On Investment calculator projects an 11-year payback on the $3,000 additional investment over the cost of a comparable HRV system.  (Source: EPA Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator.) IMGP7792But for Dan and Melora, it wasn’t just a matter of dollars and cents. Framing it more in conservation terms, the 1,315 kWh per year saved by their ERV over the HRV, is equivalent to 102 gallons of gas, 97 lbs. of coal or 21 barrels of oil. Saving that energy would be the carbon equivalent of 23 tree seedlings grown for 10 years or 0.75 Acres of forest grown in one year. The 2-bedroom, 1-bath Unity Xyla, with its super-efficient 1,028 SF first floor space plan and optional 939 SF walkout level, celebrates the lagom values at the heart of all Unity Homes. Roughly translated, lagom is a Swedish word meaning “not too much, not too little —  appropriately balanced.” The home is neither too big nor too small, but just right perched lightly on its steeply sloped site and in-balance with its surroundings. work in progress Xyla 212Entry is from the up-slope side (and future patio) directly into the living area, which is open to the eat-in kitchen and second bedroom. Down a short hallway and adjacent to bedroom two is the master bedroom and common bath. Dan and Melora plan to leave the ground floor, with its separate down-slope entry, unfinished for the time being, but it will eventually have a rec room and second bath. With the home fabricated off-site and assembled on-site over late spring/early summer, the Farrells expect to be in their home by mid August.

Project Update: Orchard Hill Breadworks Pizza Pavilion

orchard hill pizza nightWe are proud to announce that the Orchard Hill Breadworks Pizza Pavilion that Bensonwood volunteers helped build, is now open. A community supported building project dreamed up in the summer of 2013, the Pizza Pavilion is a gathering place to celebrate and share meals. Its primary use is as a place to host benefi10437442_775628855802052_4393911810537717031_nt Pizza Nights throughout the summer.

The pavilion  provides guests shelter and allow pizza night to go on despite the weather. Pizza Night started in 2007 as a small gathering of friends and family, but now attracts hundreds of guests every week of the summer with 100% of profits going to local nonprofit groups.10178060_757302684301336_2476085396725425041_n Orchard Hill Breadworks, a small, rural bakery located in southwest New Hampshire, has given away almost $30,000, $500 to $1,000 at a time to about 20 different groups. Click here to see some of the beneficiaries and visit them on Facebook to keep current.   This time lapse of the project tells a story of collaboration, cooperation and group effort.

Southern Comfort: A Unity Zūm Rises in Asheville, NC

front 2Zum_Mimken_DD_Page_1Situated 2,000 ft. above sea level in the Appalachian mountains, Asheville, North Carolina has a full range of temperatures with average January lows of 28 degrees F and average July highs of 85 degrees F, making it a prime location for Unity Homes’ energy-stingy houses. In a nutshell, Zūm’s low-load building envelope offers year-round comfort with minimal energy input, making F3 (fossil fuel free) living easily achievable. And when combined with energy rebates and incentives, the Zūm the home was even more affordable.

In addition to financial health, Zūm promotes personal health as well with its green, low-VOC materials throughout, exceptional indoor air quality, minuscule room-to-room and floor-to-ceiling temperature variants, abundance of natural light, and sound dampening shell that keeps outside noises outside.

2013.11.27_Zum_Mimken_DD_Page_2The client for Unity’s first Zūm, Nick Mimken, is a repeat client, having built his first house with Bensonwood back in 2001: an island house on Nantucket. According to Nick: “I had had a very good experience building the timber frame Nantucket house: it proved to be everything you said it would be…and more,” adding that “the Bensonwood architect, Bill Holtz, and the crew had been top notch and worked amazingly well with the local builder.”

On his latest homebuilding project with Unity Homes, Nick continues:

 Fast forward a dozen or so years and this time around I was thinking about downsizing and wanted something smaller and energy efficient when I learned about Bensonwood’s new Unity Homes. Being interested in zero energy design, I visited your headquarters, met with architect Randall Walter and sales person John Dunbar, and as before, I was impressed with the way you use the latest technology. They walked me through the computer modeling and site lines, etc. and I was sold on the process.

IMG_7150Unity Homes provided a “Tempo Offering;” a package including the home’s shell, millwork and mechanicals—ideal for do-it-yourselfers wanting to complete their prefab home in phases, or in this instance, for a client looking to build on a distant site outside our home region of New England—hiring a local builder to finish the home.

MIMKEN ZUMThe builder, Jody Guokas of JAG Construction, is finishing out the home with contemporary cement panels similar to those used on our Unity House college president’s residence in Maine, and on the Catherine Houghton Arts Center in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

Again, according to the owner/builder:

 “My local green builder, Jody Guokas, wasn’t interested in the project initially, but when he learned that Bensonwood had designed the home and would be installing the shell, he jumped on it. He wanted to learn from Bensonwood’s processes. One member of Jody’s crew had even worked at Bensonwood for a spell, so the fit was perfect.”

 P1040501The build site is a challenging, heavily-wooded lot, with the home’s footprint coming close to the setbacks on all four sides. This required the crane to precisely pick and set the wall and roof panels to avoid tree limbs, power lines and neighboring houses.IMG_7156

As for project management, Nick added: “Unity’s Ryan Lawler deserves a blue star. He worked tirelessly with me, calmly working out problems.”

Asked to sum up his experience, Nick Mimken said, “For me, it’s a story of good people, good reputation, and good process.” He then offered, “It’s a small world, so this counts.”

 

First Xyla on-site, day two

done in two days

Here are nine photos from the second day of assembly of the first Unity Home. This Xyla was fully enclosed and weather tight in two days, a day less than our initial estimate.

Unity bundle

Bundles are wrapped to protect them. Then labeled with job name, contents, and weight.

The start of day 2: The crane sets the first wall at 7:30 in the morning

The start of day 2: The crane sets the first wall at 7:30 in the morning

Tight tolerances.

Tight tolerances.

The next panel, roughly 8:15

The next panel, roughly 8:15

Doors are pre-installed in 'mini-panels', which are dropped in place on site.

Doors are pre-installed in ‘mini-panels’, which are dropped in place on site.

ceiling panel

Interior ceiling panels are uninsulated.

tolerances

An example of how tight the tolerances are. The ceiling panel is snug against both the timber and the exterior wall.

Roof panels are flown by crane, just like the walls.

Roof panels are flown by crane, just like the walls.

done in two days

3:00 PM on day two. The weather-tight shell is complete