Sunday River Ski Retreat: The Best of All Worlds

Tedford ElevationSome ski homes high on the mountain have beautiful views down the valley. Others near the base lodge typically have great views up the slopes. This timberframe home at The Glades at Ridge Run, a new slopeside residential neighborhood at Sunday River Resort in Newry, Maine, captures both.

Situated in the western mountains of Maine just three hours from Boston, Sunday River Resort has long been one of New England’s most popular four-season playgrounds, but what is so special about the property that owners Meredith and Jamie found here is that it sits uniquely midway up the mountain with expansive views above and below.

Though Meredith and Jamie had just completed an extensive renovation on another home and weren’t anxious to begin a new construction, this was the first time a ski-on, ski-off home opportunity was available at Sunday River, so the couple knew they had to jump on it. They were also motivated to replace an old beloved, but small, ski lodge they had outgrown. Sensitive to the feeling of transplanting their relatives away from a getaway that had been in the family for years, they wanted an open concept floor plan with the feel of a true home. They also wanted to maximize family interaction, and minimize the size of the house to facilitate that function—as well as for aesthetic and environmental impact motives.

sunday river family ski lodge renderingPast renovations had taught Meredith and Jamie to be flexible but decisive, which helped in this first new house project. They also knew from experience that “design by committee” was something to be avoided, rather it was better to create a team dynamic between client and architect that respected roles and responsibilities, but also valued input from all parties. The mutual trust that developed allowed changes to be made fluidly and without conflict.

The Bensonwood design team of Randall Walter, Curtis Fanti and Dave Levasseur, all avid skiers in their own right, were excited to create this special place from a perspective of years spent skiing and snowboarding. Their personal insights proved invaluable in informing practical aspects of the design.

The architectural review process at the resort and the corresponding design standards requires development that complements the surrounding natural setting; minimizing the impact on the landscape while allowing for individual freedom of design to suit the needs of each homeowner. A common theme, described as a Northeast Cottage with Adirondack and Shingle Style influences, dictates the use of building materials, colors, landscaping and building style at the resort. The style is best illustrated in Summer Cottages in the White Mountains by Bryant F. Tolles, Jr. (2000), in which the use of native materials blended with natural colors provides an effective link to both the local environment and the great cottage architecture of the early 20th century.

Sunday river ski lodgeWorking closely with the clients, the resort, the civil engineering firm Main-Land Development Consultants, Inc., and the town zoning board, Randall was able to design the energy-efficient home into a challenging site with steep terrain and protected wetlands. He was able to navigate the regulations and arrive at the design—a traditional Adirondack timber lodge style with a modern twist on the gables to accommodate the views—in a way that pleased all the parties involved. In the end, the review board process was easy and the owners got a home that fit their needs and respectfully fit the mountain landscape.

Another welcome test for Bensonwood is the truncated construction timeline. With designs finalized this past spring, the owners wanted to ski from the home this coming winter. Anxious to prove that even a custom 3,900 SF mountain home on an undeveloped site could go up in record time with our Open-Built® systems and offsite fabrication, the Bensonwood team embraced the challenge. Rapid onsite assembly will also help cut build times in half over conventional construction, effectively giving the homeowners an entire extra season to enjoy the resort.

ski deckLike many of Bensonwood’s mountain and shore homes, the house features gable roof lines, with one important distinction: these gables, dormers and bump outs will have asymmetric rooflines that permit both mountain and valley vistas as well as views of arriving and departing skiers. These roof angles, along with the heavy, rough sawn, red cedar clapboards, work to give the exterior its distinctive look: at the same time both traditional and contemporary, while the property’s southern exposure allows for plenty of natural daylighting and passive solar gain.

On the inside every detail of the sanctuary, which will accommodate three generations of family, has been strategically planned. The owners wanted to maximize the use of space, and that included the kids’ space on the ground level, with the fun feel of a ski resort locker area. The ground floor has a rustic lumberjack-inspired kids zone, with a mud room off the garage, an open play area, a game room, a guest bedroom, a bunkroom with three beds, and facing his and hers bathrooms.

The first floor has a large open space plan with cathedral ceiling and a gathering area across from the kitchen/pantry and adjacent to the dining area. The dining room will have a long, farmhouse-style table with benches accommodating 10 or more. The second floor plan has three bedroom suites, each with their own bath, and a balcony open to the gathering area below.

sunday river ski lodge renderingPerhaps the most unique feature of the project, however, is a very innovative ski-on, ski-off deck. The custom deck required Randall to create a multi-functional outdoor living space with views up and down the mountain in a style that also satisfied design review board restrictions. His solution was adjust the roof pitch and angles so skiers on the deck will still be able to enjoy the views, as he had done on the main house.

Mindful of the homeowners’ sensitivities to limiting the home’s size, he placed the deck atop the garage so skiers will have easy to the home’s bathrooms and kitchen on the main floor when they ski home at lunchtime. Unique features include a hot tub—not tucked away in a secluded spot as is often seen—but in the open air on the sheltered ski deck so all guests have ready access. There are also ski and snowboard racks, overhead heating elements, a fireplace and a hot tub on the deck.

FLOORPLANOne of the most creative elements of the home is one the clients devised. Rather than the traditional guest book for visitors to sign, the couple will immortalize them with a round timber into which they can carve their names and the dates they stay, creating a family legacy crafted in wood that will last for generations—just like the home.

Architect Randall Walter predicts that, like many vacation homes Bensonwood has crafted over the past 40 years, this house will be used much more than originally intended, because families often discover they enjoy spending time in them so much more than in their primary residence.

 

 

 

Project Update: Orchard Hill Breadworks Pizza Pavilion

orchard hill pizza nightWe are proud to announce that the Orchard Hill Breadworks Pizza Pavilion that Bensonwood volunteers helped build, is now open. A community supported building project dreamed up in the summer of 2013, the Pizza Pavilion is a gathering place to celebrate and share meals. Its primary use is as a place to host benefi10437442_775628855802052_4393911810537717031_nt Pizza Nights throughout the summer.

The pavilion  provides guests shelter and allow pizza night to go on despite the weather. Pizza Night started in 2007 as a small gathering of friends and family, but now attracts hundreds of guests every week of the summer with 100% of profits going to local nonprofit groups.10178060_757302684301336_2476085396725425041_n Orchard Hill Breadworks, a small, rural bakery located in southwest New Hampshire, has given away almost $30,000, $500 to $1,000 at a time to about 20 different groups. Click here to see some of the beneficiaries and visit them on Facebook to keep current.   This time lapse of the project tells a story of collaboration, cooperation and group effort.

LEED Platinum-Certified Bensonwood Project Wins 4th Award

A view of the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building as you approach from the road.

A view of the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building as you approach from the road.

The LEED Platinum-Certified Burr and Burton Academy Mountain Campus in Peru, VT, which Bensonwood designed, engineered and built, is a recipient of the 2014 Governor’s Awards for Environmental Excellence.

Environmental excellence awards have been given since 1993 to recognize efforts and actions of Vermonters to conserve and protect natural resources, prevent pollution, and promote environmental sustainability. To date, more than 200 efforts have been recognized.

“These projects contribute significantly to Vermont’s environmental quality and encourage others to take similar actions to protect our resources,” said Deb Markowitz, Secretary of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. “They demonstrate the importance of innovation and partnerships in enhancing and sustaining Vermont’s environmental quality.”

Award winners will be recognized at the Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility Annual Spring Conference on May 14 at the Davis Center on the University of Vermont campus in Burlington.

front of BBA's mountain campus by Bensonwood

The front entrance of the LEED Platinum-certified, net-zero energy building.

This is the fourth award in the past four months for the building. BBA’s Mountain Campus also won Efficiency Vermont’s 2014 Better Buildings by Design “Best of the Best” in Commercial Building Design and Construction, recognizing innovative and integrated design approaches for energy efficiency in Vermont’s commercial and residential buildings.

BBA Heater

The ultra-efficient masonry heater in the school building is integral to warming the building.

In November, the Mountain Campus earned a prestigious Engineering News-Record “Award of Merit” and in January 2014, it won the “AIA New Hampshire Merit Award.” The AIA jury said: “The respect for the environment is as integral to the architecture as it is to the mission of the school. The jury appreciated how the structure, columns, and framing define the composition and are a metaphor for the forest setting.”

Like Unity Homes and other Bensonwood custom timber frame projects, the building was largely prefabricated offsite and erected quickly in the forested setting to minimize impact to the local ecology.

Why We Use Dense-Packed Cellulose Insulation

Bensonwood's proprietary OBPlus Wall

A cross-section of Bensonwood’s cellulose-filled OBPlus Wall®.

Many have asked us why we use dense-packed cellulose insulation in our OBPlus Wall® panels, roofs and some ceilings and floors. Here are some of the cellulose advantages in our “Montage Building” system:

  • Our cellulose insulation is made from recycled newspapers treated with a natural mineral borate to give it a Class A fire rating as well as resistance to mold and pests.
  • The dry cellulose is blown into all the framing cavities at a settle-proof density (dense-packed), filling any shape with a continuous thermal insulation layer. The blowing process compresses the cellulose to a density of between 3 and 4 lbs/cu.ft. In addition to preventing any settling of the material, the dense-packed cellulose also cuts down convection that can occur around batt type insulation and in low-density blown fiberglass, particularly in colder temperatures.
ob plus wall with dense packed cellulose

Cellulose being blown into a Bensonwood wall panel.

  • Dense-packed cellulose blocks air movement better than fiberglass batts. While sprayfoam also seals the enclosure against air infiltration well, its rigid consistency when cured may allow it to crack as framing members around the insulation dry and move over time. Cellulose has the flexibility to allow for such movement without resulting gaps.
  • Similar to wood fiber, paper cellulose fiber manages moisture well, taking in and releasing the moisture effectively. As a result, indoor relative humidity is much more even due to the hygroscopic buffering capabilities of the cellulose insulation. This is in contrast to the hydrophobic characteristics of fiberglass and foam insulations, which lack this capability and can cause a home’s interior to experience significant swings in humidity when weather changes. So, with its tremendous insulating and moisture management characteristics, cellulose helps to buffer temperature and humidity extremes.
  • While foam insulation has a slightly higher R-Value per inch, cellulose takes less energy to manufacture than any other insulation material. This embodied energy includes the total energy required to transport the raw materials, then manufacture and distribute the finished product. Fiberglass has up to 10 times more embodied energy than cellulose and foam products have as much as 64 times more.
  • Cellulose insulation is one of the greenest building products, having the highest level of recycled content in the insulation industry—as much as 85%. Fiberglass has a maximum of 40% recycled content and foam products little or none.
  • Cellulose sequesters carbon in a building’s components instead of releasing it into the environment. Cellulose insulation is made from recycled paper that might otherwise end up in landfills, releasing methane as it decomposes, or be burned, releasing CO2. This sequestration results in a positive carbon balance which helps the efforts to lower the material’s impact on climate change.
  • Cellulose insulation is produced regionally, employing local recycling programs and independent recyclers.
  • While all insulation provides sound reduction, cellulose has approximately three times the density of fiberglass as well as fibrous consistency, delivering enhanced sound dampening.

For more details on cellulose insulation, visit http://www.nationalfiber.com/cel-Pak.htm or http://cellulose.org/GreenestInsulation/.

What dense-packed cellulose looks like inside a wall.

What dense-packed cellulose looks like inside a wall.

Rebuilding the Bartonsville Bridge

When hurricane Irene rolled through Vermont in 2011, it washed away the Bartonsville covered bridge in Rockingham, VT. The town of Rockingham agreed to rebuild the bridge and they turned to the local timberframers at Bensonwood for engineering, timber work, and construction. We’re happy to say that the bridge is nearing completion, with much of the structural timber work already complete on site. Here are some photos of the work in progress:

bartonsville01

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Working on the bridge