Texas Prefab Lake House

austin texas lake house 1 An admitted This Old House fanatic, Matt Risinger had grown up watching the PBS television series when, in 1989, a program aired that would change his life. The Wickwire Barn Series—the second time Bensonwood had appeared on the long running home improvement program— featured Tedd Benson and an old barn being converted to a new house: a project Matt had dreamed of building for himself someday. It became the seminal moment in his decision to become the best builder he could be.

Mette Aamodt AIA and Andrew Plumb AIA

Mette Aamodt, AIA & Andrew Plumb, AIA

Fast forward nearly two-and-a-half decades, and architect Andrew Plumb of award-winning Aamodt / Plumb Architects in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is looking for a builder to help assemble and finish out a highly custom modern timberframe ranch home he designed for a special client he has known for years. The lakeside projectTEXAS PREFAB, expected to approach near Passive House standards, would have an aggressive build schedule of one year, and it needed to come in at a fixed budget—so Andrew knew it had to be done right. His first thought was to call Bensonwood for its expertise in the sustainable fabrication of high performance homes, and his second thought was to call green builder, Matt Risinger, now of Risinger Homes, to say Tedd Benson’s company would be fabricating and installing the home’s shell. With the name “Benson” still fresh in his mind after a quarter century, Matt jumped at the opportunity. The home plan, viewable on the Aamodt / Plumb website, is a interpretation of the Texas Ranch vernacular, with two gabled buildings joined by a light-filled entry hall. Designed for a young family, this prefab home strives to create a relaxed, contemporary feel through the use of natural and reclaimed materials, ample daylighting and a thoughtful relationship to the site.

MATT RISINGER

Austin, Texas green builder Matt Risinger

“We sought to create a warm modern atmosphere through the interplay of simple forms, materials and natural light,” says Plumb. The play of the modern and rustic is achieved through material choices and elemental forms. Japanese (Shou Sugi Ban style) charred wood siding, mesquite and ash flooring, and an oversized FireRock masonry chimney and fireplace add a dramatic touch both inside and out. texas green prefab architects renderingThe light-filled open interior, with its elegant but simple timberframe, richly-finished flooring and high-end fixtures, perfectly complements the striking exterior while framing the surrounding views. Matt Risinger asserts that, “The most sustainable house is a pretty one. Architect-designed houses will be loved and cared for because they are beautiful. Ugly houses will fall into disrepair and be torn down eventually.” fireplaceBeyond the aesthetics, this house was designed to coast through the hot parts of the day with little need for air conditioning. This is achieved through rigorous attention to air sealing and our panelization process using super-insulated walls. All the exterior claddings are installed over a rain-screen air gap. The roof, wood siding and even stucco have an air gap behind them so that the potential for water intrusion over the life of the building is minimized. Risinger installed super-efficient mechanical equipment to make the best possible use of the resources consumed. 95%+ efficiency gas equipment, super high-efficiency AC, Ultra-Aire Split Dehumidifier prevents mold and allows the owners to keep thermostat settings high when the building is unoccupied.YOUTUBE TIMELAPSE IMAGE You can watch Matt Risinger’s YouTube video of the home being assembled here. Once the project is completed and finish photos become available, we will revisit this home to detail its space plan. Stay tuned.

Sunday River Ski Retreat: The Best of All Worlds

Tedford ElevationSome ski homes high on the mountain have beautiful views down the valley. Others near the base lodge typically have great views up the slopes. This timberframe home at The Glades at Ridge Run, a new slopeside residential neighborhood at Sunday River Resort in Newry, Maine, captures both.

Situated in the western mountains of Maine just three hours from Boston, Sunday River Resort has long been one of New England’s most popular four-season playgrounds, but what is so special about the property that owners Meredith and Jamie found here is that it sits uniquely midway up the mountain with expansive views above and below.

Though Meredith and Jamie had just completed an extensive renovation on another home and weren’t anxious to begin a new construction, this was the first time a ski-on, ski-off home opportunity was available at Sunday River, so the couple knew they had to jump on it. They were also motivated to replace an old beloved, but small, ski lodge they had outgrown. Sensitive to the feeling of transplanting their relatives away from a getaway that had been in the family for years, they wanted an open concept floor plan with the feel of a true home. They also wanted to maximize family interaction, and minimize the size of the house to facilitate that function—as well as for aesthetic and environmental impact motives.

sunday river family ski lodge renderingPast renovations had taught Meredith and Jamie to be flexible but decisive, which helped in this first new house project. They also knew from experience that “design by committee” was something to be avoided, rather it was better to create a team dynamic between client and architect that respected roles and responsibilities, but also valued input from all parties. The mutual trust that developed allowed changes to be made fluidly and without conflict.

The Bensonwood design team of Randall Walter, Curtis Fanti and Dave Levasseur, all avid skiers in their own right, were excited to create this special place from a perspective of years spent skiing and snowboarding. Their personal insights proved invaluable in informing practical aspects of the design.

The architectural review process at the resort and the corresponding design standards requires development that complements the surrounding natural setting; minimizing the impact on the landscape while allowing for individual freedom of design to suit the needs of each homeowner. A common theme, described as a Northeast Cottage with Adirondack and Shingle Style influences, dictates the use of building materials, colors, landscaping and building style at the resort. The style is best illustrated in Summer Cottages in the White Mountains by Bryant F. Tolles, Jr. (2000), in which the use of native materials blended with natural colors provides an effective link to both the local environment and the great cottage architecture of the early 20th century.

Sunday river ski lodgeWorking closely with the clients, the resort, the civil engineering firm Main-Land Development Consultants, Inc., and the town zoning board, Randall was able to design the energy-efficient home into a challenging site with steep terrain and protected wetlands. He was able to navigate the regulations and arrive at the design—a traditional Adirondack timber lodge style with a modern twist on the gables to accommodate the views—in a way that pleased all the parties involved. In the end, the review board process was easy and the owners got a home that fit their needs and respectfully fit the mountain landscape.

Another welcome test for Bensonwood is the truncated construction timeline. With designs finalized this past spring, the owners wanted to ski from the home this coming winter. Anxious to prove that even a custom 3,900 SF mountain home on an undeveloped site could go up in record time with our Open-Built® systems and offsite fabrication, the Bensonwood team embraced the challenge. Rapid onsite assembly will also help cut build times in half over conventional construction, effectively giving the homeowners an entire extra season to enjoy the resort.

ski deckLike many of Bensonwood’s mountain and shore homes, the house features gable roof lines, with one important distinction: these gables, dormers and bump outs will have asymmetric rooflines that permit both mountain and valley vistas as well as views of arriving and departing skiers. These roof angles, along with the heavy, rough sawn, red cedar clapboards, work to give the exterior its distinctive look: at the same time both traditional and contemporary, while the property’s southern exposure allows for plenty of natural daylighting and passive solar gain.

On the inside every detail of the sanctuary, which will accommodate three generations of family, has been strategically planned. The owners wanted to maximize the use of space, and that included the kids’ space on the ground level, with the fun feel of a ski resort locker area. The ground floor has a rustic lumberjack-inspired kids zone, with a mud room off the garage, an open play area, a game room, a guest bedroom, a bunkroom with three beds, and facing his and hers bathrooms.

The first floor has a large open space plan with cathedral ceiling and a gathering area across from the kitchen/pantry and adjacent to the dining area. The dining room will have a long, farmhouse-style table with benches accommodating 10 or more. The second floor plan has three bedroom suites, each with their own bath, and a balcony open to the gathering area below.

sunday river ski lodge renderingPerhaps the most unique feature of the project, however, is a very innovative ski-on, ski-off deck. The custom deck required Randall to create a multi-functional outdoor living space with views up and down the mountain in a style that also satisfied design review board restrictions. His solution was adjust the roof pitch and angles so skiers on the deck will still be able to enjoy the views, as he had done on the main house.

Mindful of the homeowners’ sensitivities to limiting the home’s size, he placed the deck atop the garage so skiers will have easy to the home’s bathrooms and kitchen on the main floor when they ski home at lunchtime. Unique features include a hot tub—not tucked away in a secluded spot as is often seen—but in the open air on the sheltered ski deck so all guests have ready access. There are also ski and snowboard racks, overhead heating elements, a fireplace and a hot tub on the deck.

FLOORPLANOne of the most creative elements of the home is one the clients devised. Rather than the traditional guest book for visitors to sign, the couple will immortalize them with a round timber into which they can carve their names and the dates they stay, creating a family legacy crafted in wood that will last for generations—just like the home.

Architect Randall Walter predicts that, like many vacation homes Bensonwood has crafted over the past 40 years, this house will be used much more than originally intended, because families often discover they enjoy spending time in them so much more than in their primary residence.

 

 

 

Project Update: Orchard Hill Breadworks Pizza Pavilion

orchard hill pizza nightWe are proud to announce that the Orchard Hill Breadworks Pizza Pavilion that Bensonwood volunteers helped build, is now open. A community supported building project dreamed up in the summer of 2013, the Pizza Pavilion is a gathering place to celebrate and share meals. Its primary use is as a place to host benefi10437442_775628855802052_4393911810537717031_nt Pizza Nights throughout the summer.

The pavilion  provides guests shelter and allow pizza night to go on despite the weather. Pizza Night started in 2007 as a small gathering of friends and family, but now attracts hundreds of guests every week of the summer with 100% of profits going to local nonprofit groups.10178060_757302684301336_2476085396725425041_n Orchard Hill Breadworks, a small, rural bakery located in southwest New Hampshire, has given away almost $30,000, $500 to $1,000 at a time to about 20 different groups. Click here to see some of the beneficiaries and visit them on Facebook to keep current.   This time lapse of the project tells a story of collaboration, cooperation and group effort.

A White Mountains Contemporary

Q&A with Owner/Builder Jeff Gilbert

smallMBR Glass Porch_1

How did you learn about us?

“I am Vice-Chair of the board of the non-profit New Hampshire Preservation Alliance and last fall we attended a retreat which toured  Southwestern NH, stopping at the Bensonwood Woodworking Shop in Alstead. While there, Tedd Benson showed up and gave an engaging talk on Bensonwood’s blend of craft and technology to build better houses. That eventually led to continued discussions with Tedd and (Bensonwood architect) Randall Walter on a home project I was working on in the White Mountains.”

What about Bensonwood resonated with you?

“I had a generic interest in utilizing computer technology in the integration of design and systems. The flexibility implicit in Bensonwood’s design and fabrication appealed to me. I was especially interested in Bensonwood’s approach to building systems: craftsmen-created with superior fit and finish, all leading to energy-efficient and environmentally friendly homes. The whole concept of applying technology to the home to make a better product interested me.”

smallGilbert_8

How did you get interested in building science?

“For a while, after law school in 1971, I moonlighted for Emil Hanslin & Tony Hanslin of Yankee Barn, selling lots at the Eastman Four Season recreational community in Grantham, NH, when I wasn’t doing my day job as a lawyer. I became interesting in building systems and off-site fabrication, as a better approach to building homes.”

“Later I became interested in the fabrication of homes and followed Acorn Deck House and others.”

How did you arrive at the distinctive design for your home?

“I had been working with an architect to design a contemporary home, but was looking for a more  overtly contemporary and distinctive design. Working with Randall Walter and Tim Olson, we were able to achieve this through the use of  dramatic shed roofs  and glass curtain walls.”

How interested were you in energy performance”

smallGilbert_7“In one of my conversations with Tedd, he mentioned that Bensonwood homes, properly sited, could maintain 42 degrees F in the dead of a northern New England winter—with the heat turned off! This appealed to me because we’ll only live part of the year in our White Mountain home. Also, with the low load of the building envelope, I can use a relatively small forced air HVAC system.”

Tell me about the property and the siting of your house.

“The house is sited south and east to take advantage of the spectacular 180 degree view overlooking the jewel of the state park system: Franconia Notch and Ridge, Mt. Lafayette, Mt. Liberty, Haystack Mountain, and Cannon Mountain ski area and, further to the east, Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. This southeast exposure will also take advantage of passive solar.”

smallMBR Glass Porch_2“My wife, who had grown up in the Littleton area and I  bought the property from a next door neighbor, who happened to be her choir teacher in school. The land abuts a two-acre conservation parcel that is a lupin field.”

How have you found working with Bensonwood so far?

“It’s been a collaborative experience: working harmoniously to develop the design. And as far as flexibility goes, being a developer, I like that I could get the high quality shell from Bensonwood, and then general contract the job myself. That really made sense for me.”

 

jeffrey-gilbertJeff Gilbert is a businessman who graduated from Dartmouth College and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He practiced law for 14 years, and thereafter spent a number of years as an investment banker. Currently, he is one of the two principals of W.J.P. Development, LLC that owns and manages three community shopping centers in New Hampshire. Since 2000, Mr. Gilbert has been active in politics, serving as a NH State Representative until 2005. From 2002 to 2004, he was Vice Chairman of the Ways & Means Committee of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, Chairman of the State Revenue Estimating Panel, Chairman of the Joint House and Senate Economic Development Study Committee, and a member of the joint House and Senate Higher Education Oversight Committee. Mr. Gilbert presently serves the State as Treasurer of the Port Advisory Council and as a member of the State Parks System Advisory Council. He is Chairman of the Board of Trustees of New Hampshire Public Broadcasting and President of the Board of Trustees of The Housing Partnership, a local organization providing affordable and workforce housing in the seacoast region. He is also Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors of The New Hampshire Preservation Alliance and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Portsmouth Athenaeum. Mr. Gilbert has three grown children and resides with his wife in Rye, New Hampshire.

 

Bensonwood Featured in History Channel Special

Bensonwood is proud to have been featured on a new two-hour H2 special: “Hidden History In Your House,” which premiered May 22nd. Host  Kevin O’Connor traveled the country uncovering the house as a technological time 1012574_401779406626551_5193879631165858028_ncapsule centuries in the making. Kevin peels back the houses we live in to reveal the surprising ways that the story of America and the history of the world are hidden inside.

The This Old House crew spent a very long, but very fun day here with Tedd and associates talking timber frame history, from harvesting the forests of the eastern woodlands to finishing and raising the timbers of a colonial home. It was also a wonderful opportunity for us to reunite with our old TOH  friends including director Thomas Draudt, cinematographer Jay Maurer and Kevin O’Connor. It’s hard to believe it has been six years since our Weston House project for the 2008 season, a new prefab, eco-friendly home reminiscent of barns built centuries ago.

Screenshot 2014-05-19 10.30.48

Rising Star, Builder Shawn Brown

shawn_brownPLACEHOLDERWhen Shawn’s high school Building Trades instructor, Chris Moore, told him of a job opening at Bensonwood, he jumped on it. Unlike some of his fellow classmates, Shawn wasn’t taking every shop course he could merely for the credits. He wanted to become a great builder. Now, coming up on his one year anniversary at Bensonwood/Unity Homes, Shawn gained valuable experience framing and sheathing panels in our Building Systems shop and traveling to regional job sites assembling the highly fabricated, panelized elements into home shells.

Since joining the company, Shawn has been amazed at how far building science has come and is eager to learn every aspect of Bensonwood’s processes. He especially likes working a few weeks in a controlled shop setting and the next week or two at an exotic job site. According to Shawn, “It’s never dull, and it’s really exciting seeing these amazing homes come together on site in a matter of days knowing the precision of the fabrication made it possible.”

Hungry for new experiences, Shawn noted, “I’ve gotten to travel to picturesque, distant, and often challenging job sites doing what I love to do.” These have included building projects as varied as a beautiful shore home in Gloucester, MA, “within a stone’s throw from the ocean,” a religious retreat in Woodbourne, NY, “with the (January) temperatures dropping to 20 below,” and most recently, a high-performance Unity Zūm home in Asheville, NC.

This summer, as a testament to his enthusiasm and quality of work, Shawn will go on site for the first time as a job captain to assemble a Unity Homes Xyla. “They’ll be an experienced job captain looking over my shoulder,” he confided, “but I’ll be responsible for raising the home’s weather-tight shell.” With Bensonwood’s ongoing culture of continuous learning, it won’t be long before he’s looking over the shoulder of some new kid with dreams of becoming a great builder.

LEED Platinum-Certified Bensonwood Project Wins 4th Award

A view of the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building as you approach from the road.

A view of the Burr and Burton Mountain Campus Academic Building as you approach from the road.

The LEED Platinum-Certified Burr and Burton Academy Mountain Campus in Peru, VT, which Bensonwood designed, engineered and built, is a recipient of the 2014 Governor’s Awards for Environmental Excellence.

Environmental excellence awards have been given since 1993 to recognize efforts and actions of Vermonters to conserve and protect natural resources, prevent pollution, and promote environmental sustainability. To date, more than 200 efforts have been recognized.

“These projects contribute significantly to Vermont’s environmental quality and encourage others to take similar actions to protect our resources,” said Deb Markowitz, Secretary of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. “They demonstrate the importance of innovation and partnerships in enhancing and sustaining Vermont’s environmental quality.”

Award winners will be recognized at the Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility Annual Spring Conference on May 14 at the Davis Center on the University of Vermont campus in Burlington.

front of BBA's mountain campus by Bensonwood

The front entrance of the LEED Platinum-certified, net-zero energy building.

This is the fourth award in the past four months for the building. BBA’s Mountain Campus also won Efficiency Vermont’s 2014 Better Buildings by Design “Best of the Best” in Commercial Building Design and Construction, recognizing innovative and integrated design approaches for energy efficiency in Vermont’s commercial and residential buildings.

BBA Heater

The ultra-efficient masonry heater in the school building is integral to warming the building.

In November, the Mountain Campus earned a prestigious Engineering News-Record “Award of Merit” and in January 2014, it won the “AIA New Hampshire Merit Award.” The AIA jury said: “The respect for the environment is as integral to the architecture as it is to the mission of the school. The jury appreciated how the structure, columns, and framing define the composition and are a metaphor for the forest setting.”

Like Unity Homes and other Bensonwood custom timber frame projects, the building was largely prefabricated offsite and erected quickly in the forested setting to minimize impact to the local ecology.