Annual Bensonwood Fundraiser Benefits Fall Mountain Food Shelf

Fall Mountain Food Shelf director, Mary Lou Huffling and Bensonwood events committee members, (L to R) Jeffery Starratt, Kevin Bittenbender, and Erik Walker, next to a carload of donated food.

Fall Mountain Food Shelf director, Mary Lou Huffling and Bensonwood events committee members, (L to R) Jeffery Starratt, Kevin Bittenbender, Huffling and Erik Walker, next to a carload of donated food. Photo by Patrick Ziselberger

With winter fast approaching, the proceeds from Bensonwood’s annual fundraiser could not have come at a better time for the Fall Mountain Food Shelf. The September 13th fundraiser, attended by over 200 people, raised $5,500, a record for the event, which was matched by an anonymous donor, bringing the total to $11,000. In addition, an estimated 40 to 50 bags of groceries were donated.

A much appreciative Mary Lou Huffling, Director of the Fall Mountain Food Shelf, accepted the proceeds, indicating how badly the food and donations are needed, especially now with the colder weather arriving early. “So many people are coming to use the food shelf and we have to buy most of the food ourselves,” said Mary Lou, adding, “This money will buy a lot of food and help a lot of people.”

According to Kevin Bittenbender, Head of Production at Bensonwood, “We have had a fall party for many years (over 10 years), but it was in 2010 when we turned the event into more of a fundraiser for the Fall Mountain Food Shelf.” Then, commenting on Bensonwood’s focus on giving back to the community, Kevin added, “We like to support local organizations where we feel we can really make a difference. The Fall Mountain Food Shelf is the perfect fit for the kind of organization that we like to support.”

The Fall Mountain Food Shelf spends between $2,500 and $3,000 a week on food, so the timing of the Bensonwood event could not have been better. In the fall, their donations are down, just as the needs get greater. Among the recurrent needs that must be addressed at this time of year, the food shelf recently received calls from several individuals who have been laid off for the season and were inquiring about obtaining food.

Many local businesses and individuals contributed products and money to the fundraiser. $1,100 was raised from the event raffle and $3,400 from cash donations, all of which was added to a $1,000 donation from Bensonwood. Without the help of these businesses, friends and neighbors, and especially the anonymous matching donor, the event would not have been such a success.

The business donors for the fundraising event included: Bingham Lumber, C & S Grocers, Canmar LLC, Cleary Millwork, Diamond Pizza, Duncan Gowdy, Foard Panel, Harpoon Brewery, HHOMG Inc, Hooper Golf Club, Kapiloff Insurance Agency, LaValley’s Building Supply, Morrison & Tyson Communications, Murray’s Restaurant, Perkins Home Center, Pete’s Farm Stand, Raven Workshop, Real to Reel, Russell Supply Corp., Shaw’s of Walpole, Taylor’s Welding, The Bread Shed, The Village Blooms, Tractor Supply of Walpole, Vermont Custom Cabinetry, Walpole Village Salon and the Walpole Village Tavern.

 

 

Bensonwood Celebrates 11th Year Riding The Prouty to Fight Cancer

bensonwood beam team cyclistsIn our 11th year riding the Prouty, our 52 team members raised $11,000 for the Norris Cotton Cancer Center at Dartmouth-Hitchcock. Our team members ranged in age from 5 to 65+!

The 33rd Annual Prouty raised over $2.7 million from cyclists, walkers, rowers, golfers and “virtual” participants, like our West Coast sales rep., Marilyn Taggart, in Seattle.

finish lineMarilyn (below) rode the Iron Goat (aka Mosquito!) Trail, an old railroad bed in the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Forest in Washington State.

virtual prouty rider

Project Update: Orchard Hill Breadworks Pizza Pavilion

orchard hill pizza nightWe are proud to announce that the Orchard Hill Breadworks Pizza Pavilion that Bensonwood volunteers helped build, is now open. A community supported building project dreamed up in the summer of 2013, the Pizza Pavilion is a gathering place to celebrate and share meals. Its primary use is as a place to host benefi10437442_775628855802052_4393911810537717031_nt Pizza Nights throughout the summer.

The pavilion  provides guests shelter and allow pizza night to go on despite the weather. Pizza Night started in 2007 as a small gathering of friends and family, but now attracts hundreds of guests every week of the summer with 100% of profits going to local nonprofit groups.10178060_757302684301336_2476085396725425041_n Orchard Hill Breadworks, a small, rural bakery located in southwest New Hampshire, has given away almost $30,000, $500 to $1,000 at a time to about 20 different groups. Click here to see some of the beneficiaries and visit them on Facebook to keep current.   This time lapse of the project tells a story of collaboration, cooperation and group effort.

Bensonwood Designer Tim Olson Wins AIA-VT Emerging Professionals Award

Tim Olson Common Core Library

Bensonwood Design team member Tim Olson took Third Place in the AIA Vermont 2014 Emerging Professionals Network Design Competition: “Engaging the Public Library.”

The Emerging Professionals Network of Vermont is a component of AIA Vermont, and serves local emerging professionals by representation on the AIAVT Board of Directors, while in turn educating members about important developments within the design and construction industry. The EPN also serves a larger purpose by organizing events and projects that bring together students, young designers and experienced architects, in order to promote architecture and good design in the community.

Contrary to popular belief, public libraries are not a declining institution. Over the past 12 years (a period experiencing a dramatic expansion of the internet as well as a shrinking of public funding) yearly visits, program attendance and total income for Vermont public libraries have increased by more than 50%. Therefore, the issue is not making libraries relevant again, but strengthening the relevance of libraries for the future.

The competition asked emerging architectural professionals from around New England to design an architectural intervention that reinforces and expands the relevance of the public library.

Competitors specifically addressed:

–          How can architectural interventions catalyze the exchange of ideas in a library and its community?

–          What programs and amenities can attract new user groups while maintaining existing patrons?

–          How is a public library a distinct form of access for information, knowledge and discussion?

–          What is the contemporary function, role and identity of the New England public library?

Tim Olson AIA Vermont Board

Entries came in from emerging professionals in Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Connecticut and Rhode Island, with designs in the form of additions, renovations, and satellite structures under 2,000 square feet. Winners were selected by a jury of architects, librarians and community members who considered graphic clarity, originality and cohesiveness of concept.

Tim’s entry, The Common Core, proposed that libraries provide an essential and rare type of civic space where populations can collect and engage in the social construction of community through the cohabitation of a shared resource.

Olson imagined a Public Library with a central space at its core that could be accessed and utilized by a larger cross section of the population. This space could be activated both during normal library hours for children’s programs, reading rooms and study space. In the after hours, or for special events the space could transform into a lounge, community living room, or an ad-hoc movie theater—a space designed to host book openings, film screenings, public lectures and art events. The Common Core offers the insertion of a “stage” and adjoining “fly loft” to make this diversity of programs possible.

The exhibit will be displayed at the Pierson Library in Shelburne, Vermont, and then travel around the state with the AIAVT Design Awards.

The Common Core offers the insertion of a “stage” and adjoining “fly loft” to make this diversity of programs possible. By radically compacting furnishings into a vertical space, an expansion in the programmatic potentials can be accomplished while maintaining the urban location, historic facade and footprint of the New England Public Library.

The exhibit will be displayed at the Pierson Library in Shelburne, Vermont and then travel around the state with the AIAVT Design Awards.

Project Update: Cotuit Kettleers Grandstand

bensonwood grandstands in Cotuit, MA Bensonwood Day at the Cotuit Kettleers game June 14th on Cape Cod was a great success. The home team won, the rain stayed away and our wooden grandstands made their debut at Elizabeth Lowell Park.

The hometown crowd was very proud of their new wooden grandstands…and so were we! Several members of the Bensonwood team that worked on the project were in attendance to receive a round of applause from the crowd, including Tom Olson, Erik Walker, Chris Kehl, Hans Porschitz, Elizabeth Beauregard and Mark Williston.

Chris Carbone 1st pitchChief Structural Engineer Chris Carbone threw out the first pitch—putting it down the middle and keeping out of the dirt (unlike some celebrity first pitches we’ve seen lately).

The grandstands were engineered and fabricated at our Walpole, NH facilities into timberframe superstructure elements, as well as panelized platform risers, framing and seating assemblies.

cotuit8The finished assemblies were trucked to the site and flown into place by a crane, greatly reducing the onsite construction time. See our March 2014 Newsletter for more on the design and construction.

The Cotuit Athletic Association was organized in 1947, primarily as a sponsor for the Cotuit Kettleers baseball team. The Cotuit Athletic Association was chartered in Massachusetts as a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization in 1963, and has grown tremendously in its scope since that time.

Cotuit Athletic Association members fully maintain the Lowell Park baseball facility (field maintenance and capital improvements), find housing and jobs for the team members and coaches, provide uniforms and baseball equipment for a 44-game schedule, and operate baseball/softball clinics for youngsters.

cotuit7The Cotuit Athletic Association gives college $750 scholarships to local residents, awards high school MVP trophies in both boys and girls baseball and hockey programs, donates baseball clinic camperships, and sponsors seven baseball/softball teams in local community recreation departments.

cotuit14cotuit5cotuit2The Cotuit Kettleers were selected by the Cape Cod Baseball League as the first recipient of its Franchise of the Year Award in 1990 and in 2000 was named the Best Amateur College Program of the Decade by Baseball America. In 2006, the Cotuit Kettleers received the prestigious Commissioner’s Cup as the CCBL Team of the Year. The Cotuit Kettleers have won a record 15 Cape Cod Baseball League championships.

cotuit9